top 10 best place in india

1.Agra
City in Uttar Pradesh


Agra is a city in northern India’s Uttar Pradesh state. It's home to the iconic Taj Mahal, a mausoleum built for the Mughal ruler Shah Jahan’s wife, Mumtaz Mahal (who died in childbirth in 1631). The imposing main building features a massive dome and intricately carved white marble inlaid with precious stones. This is set behind a reflecting pool inside a courtyard defined by 4 minarets.
Near the Taj Mahal are the 20m-high red-brick walls of Agra Fort, a grand Mughal fortress and palace, much of it dating to the 16th and 17th centuries. Across the Yamuna River is another striking tomb, Itimad-ud-Daula, which prefigures the Taj Mahal by a few years, earning it the nickname "Baby Taj.” West of the city is the remarkably well-preserved “ghost city” of Fatehpur Sikri, whose red-sandstone royal apartments, harem quarters and pavilions date to the late 1500s, when it was briefly the capital of the Mughal empire
2.Delhi
State of India


Delhi, India’s capital territory, is a massive metropolitan area in the country’s north. In Old Delhi, a neighborhood dating to the 1600s, stands the imposing Mughal-era Red Fort, a symbol of India, and the sprawling Jama Masjid mosque, whose courtyard accommodates 25,000 people. Nearby is Chandni Chowk, a vibrant bazaar filled with food carts, sweets shops and spice stalls.


The Rajpath, a formal boulevard in the New Delhi government district, connects the India Gate war memorial and the massive presidential palace Rashtrapati Bhavan. Other significant sites include Lodi Gardens, a park featuring monumental tombs and acres of greenery; Mughal emperor Humayun’s tomb, a precursor of the Taj Mahal; Qutub Minar, a medieval brick minaret; and the flower-shaped Lotus Temple, a Bahá'í house of worship. Delhi also has a strong nightclub scene as well as many prominent museums, including ones dedicated to Mahatma Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru, leaders of Indian independence

3.Jaipur
City in Rajasthan


Jaipur is the capital of India’s Rajasthan state. It evokes the royal family that once ruled the region and that, in 1727, founded what is now called the Old City, or “Pink City” for its trademark building color. At the center of its stately street grid (notable in India) stands the opulent, colonnaded City Palace complex. With gardens, courtyards and museums, part of it is still a royal residence.
Across from the City Palace is Jantar Mantar, an open-air astronomical observatory from the early 18th century. Also nearby is the Hawa Mahal (Palace of the Winds), a former cloister for royal women fronted by a rippling 5-story screen of pink sandstone. Several kilometers outside the city center, elephants carry visitors uphill to the imposing Amer Fort, which features elaborate wall carvings and paintings. On the way to the fort, many visitors stop on the banks of Man Sagar Lake to photograph Jal Mahal, a partially submerged palace that famously reflects in the water
4.Goa
State of India


Goa is a state in western India with coastlines stretching along the Arabian Sea. Its long history as a Portuguese colony prior to 1961 is evident in its preserved 17th-century churches and the area’s tropical spice plantations. Goa is also known for its beaches, ranging from popular stretches at Baga and Palolem to those in laid-back fishing villages such as Agonda.
Old Goa is home to the massive, Portuguese-style Se Cathedral and the baroque Basilica of Bom Jesus, which holds the remains of the state’s patron saint, Francis Xavier. In Panaji, the capital, the Latin Quarter’s winding streets contain galleries, cafes and colonial-era Portuguese-style homes. For shopping, visitors flock to Anjuna’s famous flea market and Mackie’s seasonal night bazaar. On the coast, the Salim Ali Bird Sanctuary provides a look at a native mangrove ecosystem. Goa's interior features small villages, quiet retreats, waterfalls and jungle trails.
5.Varanasi
City in Uttar Pradesh


Varanasi is a city in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh dating to the 11th century B.C. Regarded as the spiritual capital of India, the city draws Hindu pilgrims who bathe in the Ganges River’s sacred waters and perform funeral rites. Along the city's winding streets are some 2,000 temples, including Kashi Vishwanath, the “Golden Temple,” dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva.
Boat cruises take visitors past the many ghats (steps leading down to the river) on the waterfront, including the Dashashwamedh Ghat to watch the fiery aarti ritual, performed nightly. Manikarnika Ghat is the principal cremation ground of Varanasi, with 24-hour flaming funeral pyres. Another notable ghat is Man Mandir Ghat, topped by a large palace built in 1600. Above the river, the Mughal-style Ramnagar Fort was the palace of the former Maharaja of Varanasi and is now a museum. About 11km north of town, Sarnath, where Buddha gave his first sermon at the site of Dhamekh Stupa, features ancient temples.
6.Manali
Town in Himachal Pradesh


Manali is a high-altitude Himalayan resort town in India’s northern Himachal Pradesh state. It has a reputation as a backpacking center and honeymoon destination. Set on the Beas River, it’s a gateway for skiing in the Solang Valley and trekking in Parvati Valley. It's also a jumping-off point for paragliding, rafting and mountaineering in the Pir Panjal mountains, home to 4,000m-high Rohtang Pass.
The Mall Road and its bazaar are the town’s focal point, while the Old Manali neighborhood is home to traditional stone buildings, apple orchards and the Hindu Manu Temple. Across the Manaslu River on a forested hilltop is wood-carved Hadimba Devi Temple, built in 1553 and dedicated to a Hindu goddess. The Museum of Himachal Culture and Folk Art preserves local crafts and heritage. In the Tibetan quarter, the Buddhist monastery Gadhan Thekchhokling is recognizable by its yellow, pagoda-style roof. East of the Beas River is Vashisht, a village known for its hot springs.
7.Mumbai
City in Maharashtra


Mumbai (formerly called Bombay) is a densely populated city on India’s west coast. A financial center, it's India's largest city. On the Mumbai Harbour waterfront stands the iconic Gateway of India stone arch, built by the British Raj in 1924. Offshore, nearby Elephanta Island holds ancient cave temples dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. The city's also famous as the heart of the Bollywood film industry.
Landmark British colonial buildings include Chhatrapati Shivaj Terminus, an ornate train station melding Gothic Revival and Mughal architecture. The castlelike Bombay High Court features octagonal turrets. Immense Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya is a museum displaying ethnographic and natural history collections. Chor Bazaar is known for its antiques, while Mangaldas Market has textiles, and Zaveri Bazaar is filled with jewelry shops. Marine Drive terminates at popular Chaupati Beach. On the city’s outskirts in Sanjay Gandhi National Park is Kanheri, a cave system carved by Buddhists beginning in the 1st century B.C
8.Shimla
City in Himachal Pradesh


Shimla is the capital of the northern Indian state of Himachal Pradesh, in the Himalayan foothills. Once the summer capital of British India, it remains the terminus of the narrow-gauge Kalka-Shimla Railway, completed in 1903. It’s also known for the handicraft shops that line The Mall, a pedestrian avenue, as well as the Lakkar Bazaar, a market specializing in wooden toys and crafts.
Hindu shrines in the area include Kali Bari Temple near The Mall and Jakhu Temple on Jakhu Hill, dedicated to the monkey god Hanuman. The hill is Shimla’s highest point, also known for its sunrise views across the Himalayas. The town’s British colonial architectural heritage includes Gothic Victorian structures such as Christ Church and the Gaiety Theatre. There’s also a mock-Tudor half-timbered library, and the Scottish baronial mansion formerly known as Viceregal Lodge, built in 1888 and now home to an academic foundation. Outside of Shimla are picturesque hill resorts such as Naldehra, as well as Chadwick Falls.
9.Udaipur
City in Rajasthan


Udaipur, formerly the capital of the Mewar Kingdom, is a city in the western Indian state of Rajasthan. Founded by Maharana Udai Singh II in 1559, it’s set around a series of artificial lakes and is known for its lavish royal residences. City Palace, overlooking Lake Pichola, is a monumental complex of 11 palaces, courtyards and gardens, famed for its intricate peacock mosaics.
Lake Pichola boat tours take visitors past the 18th-century, white-marble Lake Palace, which covers an entire island and is now a hotel. Another island contains the domed Jagmandir Palace, former summer resort of the Maharanas, mostly constructed in the 17th century. Elsewhere, in Udaipur’s sprawling old city, is towering Jagdish Temple, completed in 1651 and dedicated to the Hindu god Vishnu. The Bhartiya Lok Kala Museum of regional folk art is known for its traditional puppet shows, while the hilltop Monsoon Palace offers sweeping views of the city and the surrounding ridges
10.Munnar
Town in Kerala


Munnar is a town in the Western Ghats mountain range in India’s Kerala state. A hill station and former resort for the British Raj elite, it's surrounded by rolling hills dotted with tea plantations established in the late 19th century. Eravikulam National Park, a habitat for the endangered mountain goat Nilgiri tahr, is home to the Lakkam Waterfalls, hiking trails and 2,695m-tall Anamudi 
Peak.
The Tea Museum at the Nallathanni Estate presents the region’s history of tea production. Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary is an ecotourism site that protects numerous animal species. Northeast of town, Top Station is a 1,700m-high overlook and trekking site with views over the mountains. Fields of blue Neelakurinji flowers bloom there once every 12 years. En route to Top Station, reservoirs at Mattupetty Dam and Kundala Dam are popular for boating and picnicking. Aside from Lakkam, the region's many picturesque waterfalls include Attukal and Chinnakanal

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